PTE ACADEMIC READING RE ORDER SAMPLE PRACTICE 7 - PTE Academic study guide

PTE ACADEMIC READING RE ORDER SAMPLE PRACTICE 7

PTE ACADEMIC READING RE ORDER SAMPLE PRACTICE 7

1.

A. He was bone-weary and soul-weary, and found himself muttering, “Either I can’t manage this place, or it’s unmanageable.”
B. To his horror, he realized that he had become the victim of an amorphous, unwitting, unconscious conspiracy to immerse him in routine work that had no significance.
C. It was one of those nights in the office when the office clock was moving towards four in the morning and Bennis was still not through with the incredible mass of paper stacked before him.
D. He reached for his calendar and ran his eyes down each hour, half-hour, and quarter-hour, to see where his time had gone that day, the day before, the month before.

2.

A. With that, I swallowed the shampoo and obtained most realistic results on the spot.
B. The man shuffled away into the back regions to make up a prescription, and after a moment I got through on the shop telephone to the Consulate, intimating my location.
C. Then, while the pharmacist was wrapping up a six-ounce bottle of the mixture, I groaned and inquired whether he could give me something for acute gastric cramp.
D. I intended to stage a sharp gastric attack, and entering an old-fashioned pharmacy, I asked for a popular shampoo mixture, consisting of olive and flaked soap.

3. A. Since then, intelligence tests have been mostly used to separate dull children in school from average or bright children, so that special education can be provided to the dull.
B. In other words, intelligence tests give us a norm for each age.
C. Intelligence is expressed as intelligence quotient, and tests are developed to indicate what an average child of a certain age can do: what a 5-year-old can answer, but a 4-year-old cannot, for instance.
D. Binet developed the first set of such tests in the early 1900s to find out which children in school needed special attention.
E. Intelligence can be measured by tests.

4.

A. This is now orthodoxy to which I subscribe— up to a point.
B. It emerged from the mathematics of chance and statistics
C. Therefore the risk is measurable and manageable.
D. The fundamental concept: Prices are not predictable, but the mathematical laws of chance can describe their fluctuations.
E. This is how what business schools now call modern finance was born.

5.

A. Similarly, turning to caste, even though being lower caste is undoubtedly a separate cause of disparity, its impact is all the greater when the lower-caste families also happen to be poor.
B. Belonging to a privileged class can help a woman to overcome many barriers that obstruct women from less thriving classes.
C. It is the interactive presence of these two kinds of deprivation—being low class and being female—that massively impoverishes women from the less privileged classes.
D. A congruence of class deprivation and gender discrimination can blight the lives of poorer women very severely.
E. Gender is certainly a contributor to societal inequality, but it does not act independently of class.

PTE ACADEMIC READING RE ORDER SAMPLE PRACTICE 7

ANSWER:-

1  CADB
2  DCBA
3  EDACB
4  EBDCA
5  EBDCA

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